July 12, 2016
SHARE
COMMONS
58
When CSIS Comes Knocking
Vicky and Supriya talk to human rights activist Monia Mazigh about CSIS's unannounced visits to Muslim men's homes and workplaces.
Supriya Dwivedi
Host
Vicky Mochama
Host & Writer
Kevin Sexton
Producer

A number of Muslim men have reached out to Monia Mazigh after having CSIS show up unannounced at their homes or workplaces. The intelligence agency has been doing this for years and says the discussions are voluntary, but some people see them as intimidation techniques.

Monia is the national coordinator for the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group. She joins Supriya and Vicky to talk about these CSIS visits, as well as the government’s tabled legislation–Bill C-22–that would create parliamentary oversight of national security agencies.

Read Monia’s Huffington Post article here.

Here’s the full statement we received from CSIS in response to Monia’s concerns about unannounced visits, racial profiling and diversity within the organisation:

Intelligence officers from the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) build relationships with individuals and human sources to collect information to advise our government about possible threats to the country.  When it seeks cooperation or assistance of Canadians, CSIS emphasizes the voluntary nature of discussions. The Service ensures that its approach is lawful, ethical, necessary, proportionate to the threat in question, and an effective and efficient means of meeting the operational objective.  We do not employ racial profiling as an operational strategy.

With regard to your question about employment equity and diversity at CSIS, our 2014-15 Employment Equity report identified that visible minorities at CSIS made up 14.8% of the organization, a figure which we are working to improve.  At CSIS, diversity is not only part of the culture, it is a core business strategy. The diversity of the CSIS workforce helps support the achievement of our objectives. It allows us to better understand the demographics of the Canadian communities we protect, therefore better equipping us to collect relevant and accurate intelligence.

Collectively, CSIS employees speak 106 languages.

At the request of the CSIS Director, a gender equity analysis was undertaken in 2015 to determine if there are barriers to female progression into the senior management levels of the organization and, if so, to establish an action plan to address the issues. As of March 31, 2016, females occupied 33% of all CSIS executive level positions, with females accounting for 42% of the senior executive committee.

Kind regards,

RO

Roxanne Ouellette

A/Chief, Public Affairs|Chef intérimaire, Les Affaires Publiques

Communications Branch|Bureau des communications

Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS)|Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité (SCRS)

More from this series
Mandalena Lewis is one of far too many flight attendants who have been harassed or assaulted on the job. And her story is just one example of a culture of sexism and abuse that she alleges pervades the airline industry.
June 12, 2024
In 2006, Zakaria Amara was arrested and imprisoned for planning what could have been one of the deadliest terror attacks in Canadian history. A ringleader of the so-called “Toronto 18,” he’s one of the most infamous Canadian convicts of the last few decades.  This conversation is the first time he’s ever given an interview to a member of the press.
June 5, 2024
♩♪ But Spotify, it’s nearly killed us Ticketmaster’s ground us to dust The companies got too large Now monopolies are in charge ♩♪
May 29, 2024
Not only do Canadian prisoners work for for-profit businesses, but they’re sometimes doing the most dangerous and nauseating work around
May 22, 2024
If we want to truly understand our criminal justice system and Canadian labour, we need to examine how prisoners work.
May 15, 2024
In Newfoundland and Labrador, fishing is more than just an industry or a job. It truly is a way of life. It’s at the core of what has made this place what it is.
May 8, 2024
The history of the Atlantic fishery can be understood as a power struggle between fishermen and merchants.
May 1, 2024
This isn’t just history. It’s prophecy. It’s a vision of what may come if we continue to ignore the ecological limits of this planet in the pursuit of profit.
April 24, 2024
all podcasts arrow All Podcasts
COMMONS