February 24, 2014
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#21 Jonathan Kay Defends Rex Murphy
The pundit won't talk, but his National Post editor will.

Synopsis:

Rex Murphy won’t answer questions about taking Oil Sands money , but his editor, The National Post’s Jon Kay, will.

Links:

Rex Murphy’s response to the issue…

….parsed by Andrew Mitrovica

What seems to be a proposal from The National Post to The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, pitching a financial partnership to use the Post’s editorial platform to further the energy industry’s interests. (link)

Guest: 

Jonathan Kay is editor of the National Post’s comment pages,  and a National Post columnist.  He is the author of the book “Among the Truthers“.

People mentioned: 

Rex Murphy, Andrew Mitrovica, Neil Young, David Pogue, Doug Kelly

Topics discussed:

Has Rex Murphy been paid by Oil Sands companies? How much? How often? If he has done nothing wrong and has nothing to hide, why won’t he disclose this? Should The National Post run a disclosure with his columns? Might these payments influence his writing? Would it change the way readers think about him or his opinions? Is The National Post’s credibility at stake? Is The National Post itself editorially partnered with the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP)?

 

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