CANADALAND
#219 Where Is Rock Bottom? Live From Saskatchewan, Before The Trial (Rebroadcast)
On February 9, Gerald Stanley — the farmer accused of killing 22-year-old Cree man, Colten Boushie, in Battleford, Saskatchewan — was acquitted of second-degree murder. In the wake of the verdict, Jesse revisits a conversation he had in Saskatoon with Betty Ann Adam (Saskatoon StarPhoenix), Rob Innes (Assistant Professor, University of Saskatchewan), and Mylan Tootoosis (PhD candidate, University of Saskatchewan). This show was recorded live at Winterruption in Cosmo Seniors Centre on January 20th, 2017. The original airing of this episode was produced by Katie Jensen.   UPDATE (March 26, 2018): This episode has been edited to remove a comment from panelist Betty Ann Adam, who said: “When there’s a comparison made to Rodney King, that is kind of ridiculous, when you consider that 50 people died in those riots that went on for five days, and a billion dollars’ worth of property damage occurred. Thousands of businesses were destroyed. Now, in Canada, Indigenous people don’t do that en masse. As Mylan said, the people here signed treaty, and generally speaking, Indigenous people respond to oppression and racist policy with dignity and forbearance. We have had some fiery orators as leaders, who have spoken truth in fiery language. But it hasn’t led to burning buildings.”  While Adam has since clarified that she meant to reject Pastor Mark Kleiner’s declaration that “Colten Boushie is the Rodney King of Western Canada” because “that comparison invites expectations of violent reprisal, something settler Canadians fear from Indigenous people, but which has no modern basis in fact” — she recognizes that her phrasing could lead listeners to infer that she was “pronouncing a judgement on the response to the Rodney King verdict.…I absolutely did not intend the remarks as a negative comparison with any race.”
February 19, 2018

On February 9, Gerald Stanley — the farmer accused of killing 22-year-old Cree man, Colten Boushie, in Battleford, Saskatchewan — was acquitted of second-degree murder.

In the wake of the verdict, Jesse revisits a conversation he had in Saskatoon with Betty Ann Adam (Saskatoon StarPhoenix), Rob Innes (Assistant Professor, University of Saskatchewan), and Mylan Tootoosis (PhD candidate, University of Saskatchewan).

This show was recorded live at Winterruption in Cosmo Seniors Centre on January 20th, 2017. The original airing of this episode was produced by Katie Jensen.

 

UPDATE (March 26, 2018): This episode has been edited to remove a comment from panelist Betty Ann Adam, who said: “When there’s a comparison made to Rodney King, that is kind of ridiculous, when you consider that 50 people died in those riots that went on for five days, and a billion dollars’ worth of property damage occurred. Thousands of businesses were destroyed. Now, in Canada, Indigenous people don’t do that en masse. As Mylan said, the people here signed treaty, and generally speaking, Indigenous people respond to oppression and racist policy with dignity and forbearance. We have had some fiery orators as leaders, who have spoken truth in fiery language. But it hasn’t led to burning buildings.” 

While Adam has since clarified that she meant to reject Pastor Mark Kleiner’s declaration that “Colten Boushie is the Rodney King of Western Canada” because “that comparison invites expectations of violent reprisal, something settler Canadians fear from Indigenous people, but which has no modern basis in fact” — she recognizes that her phrasing could lead listeners to infer that she was “pronouncing a judgement on the response to the Rodney King verdict.…I absolutely did not intend the remarks as a negative comparison with any race.”
More from this series
Funding cuts, tuition increases and staff layoffs. What's going on with post-secondary institutions in Alberta?
June 27, 2022
Steven Newmaster, a botany professor, once shone a light on the nutritional supplement industry and called them frauds. Now, the light is being shone on him by his colleagues. And boy, buckle up because this story is a wild ride.
June 20, 2022
A wave of retail and service sector workers are unionizing their workplaces, pushing back against anti-union practices. Why is this happening now? And can workers win in the long run?
June 13, 2022
Ostensibly the idea was to do media criticism. That is what the article, The Year Of The Graves, in the National Post set out to do: correct errors in how the discovery of unmarked graves was reported. But that was not its impact.
June 6, 2022
A field report from coast Salish territory on the irreconcilable conflict between the Tsleil-Waututh Nation and the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion project. There are 73 remaining Southern Resident Killer Whales in existence. The Tsleil-Waututh Nation consider the survival of these orcas and the survival of their people to be the same thing. The government insists a compromise can be met. The Tsleil-Waututh reject this notion, and many are prepared to die in defense of their "wolves of the sea". Brandi Morin reports.
May 30, 2022
A look at the wonderfully bizarre history of Vancouver’s warring Italian-language newspapers.
May 23, 2022
Operation Medusa has become the most celebrated battle in recent Canadian history. It was hailed as a stroke of military genius that may have vanquished the Taliban once and for all. But that was never the whole story.
May 16, 2022
With the seemingly imminent repeal of Roe v. Wade in the United States, it's time to refamiliarize ourselves with Canada's long-fought history for abortion access.
May 9, 2022
all podcasts arrow All Podcasts
CANADALAND